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A Decisive Turning Point

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A vote to roll back insurance regulations of the Affordable Care Act may represent the most decisive turning point of the Obama presidency. Thirty-nine Democrats—more than a fifth of all Democrats in the House—joined united Republicans in voting to allow insurance companies to write the same policies they offered before passage of Obamacare.

For the first time, Democrats are deeply divided, with significant numbers ready to defy their leaders on Capitol Hill and in the White House. If the GOP can maintain its unity on key issues, and not become distracted by ego-driven jockeying by presidential prospects, conservatives can press this advantage.

The key to political victory is always uniting your own side while dividing the opposition. The ongoing fight to spare Americans from the disruptions and dysfunctions of Obamacare enables Republicans to do just that.

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  1. jguy  •  Nov 21, 2013 at 8:21 am

    And still we have no better plan from the right that would realign
    a healthcare system that due to massively inflated costs have
    become prohibitive for the average person without paying for
    protection through capitalized insurance….a system that has
    created a medical aristocracy and often leads to financial and
    family ruin for the less fortunate. The Presidents plan which has
    been greatly distorted and damaged initially attempted to address
    these issues. It is my hope that some Republican or Democrat can
    successfully address healthcare reform in the near future.

    • NetworkDr  •  Nov 22, 2013 at 9:26 pm

      All the Republican suggestions, Cross-State line competition, tort reform, tax-deferred HSA’s etc…all ignored by the Democratic party. No input from Republicans was accepted in crafting the ACA.
      Free-market efforts in the economy have ALWAYS worked better than government intrusion.

      • jguy  •  Dec 15, 2013 at 2:57 pm

        True….those elements were suggested and tort reform is massively needed….but the
        things you mention do not add the element of universal availability of health care
        for many nonwealthy americans. Free-market efforts work better for people who
        are fortunate enough to be winners in a capitalized systems…..most endeavors can
        be spread over time or quality of desired element….but health care differs in that
        its use is not normally elective and when things happen like….a broken leg…or
        a dread disease one has no choice but to get help. This difference has motivated most
        of the world to adapt a government noncapitalized health care system.

  2. greg mchugh  •  Nov 21, 2013 at 10:50 pm

    The president and both parties in congress need to get out of our insurance plans and our healthcare,doctors,and medical procedures,If you want a shining example of what happens when government gets involved in healthcare look no further than the v.a. that will be the future of healthcare for americans..

  3. Rona  •  Nov 22, 2013 at 5:39 pm

    Too bad it comes too late for the State of Washington. Apparently we still have to buy policies that meet the Obamacare guidelines. Our daughter had her insurance canceled, and so far there is no sign that she is going to get it back.

  4. Mike A  •  Nov 25, 2013 at 1:38 pm

    Think back 150 years. At that time, “health care” was essentially home remedies, and minor “surgeries” that involved liquor for anesthesia, or at least a bullet to bite on. Payment was delivered by the patient to the doctor, who knew the patient’s capacity to pay. There were very few middlemen who made any profit off of this exchange.

    Keep in mind – the technology and techniques of health care at that time were little better than they’d been for centuries. There were no complex procedures, no drugs that took billions to get approved, no MRIs, no CAT scans, no transplants, and no devices that kept people alive long after they would have died without them. Because of this, and this is important – Americans did not *expect* to have their lives extended by expensive, complex procedures and drugs. How could they? They didn’t know such things would be possible.

    Fast forward to today. Health care is now a multi-billion dollar “industry”, in which millions of people make a living from the “administration” of it, and many more millions make profits from the stock purchases they make in companies that do the administration. In other words, many tens of millions of Americans make money (often huge sums of it) from the exchange between a doctor and patient, and they are neither. Further, most Americans have come to *expect* that their lives will be extended well beyond what their lifestyle would have supported just 150 years ago. And when you add on the fact that we’ve become fat and idle, well – thus you have a “crisis”.

    The solution is simple – the money that flows through the system has to be spent more on the doctor patient exchange, and less on administrative costs and profit making. This is precisely why most developed nations have moved towards non-profit health care delivery. The USA will almost certainly need to move in that direction over the next 10 to 20 years. How that comes to pass will be a function of the marketplace, politics, and social attitudes.

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