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Lesson from Nature: Do Better than Dogs

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The New York Times recently reported on new research on the origin of dogs, with unexpected lessons about the vital connection between family values and self-reliance. Dogs are closely related to wolves – so close, in fact, that dogs and wolves can interbreed easily and some scientists don’t even accept the idea that they constitute separate species. But when it comes to mating and offspring there’s a big difference. As the Times observes: “Wolves mate for the long haul and wolf dads help with the young, while dogs are completely promiscuous and the males pay no attention to their offspring.”

When human beings behave like dogs, with promiscuous and uninvolved males, they become dependent like dogs, counting on some higher power–like government–to meet their needs.  But when we act like wolves, with lasting relationships and involved fathers, we can take care of ourselves and live with dignity and independence, without relying on some all-powerful master and provider.

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